eduguedes

Eduardo Guedes Guedes itibaren Plank, IA, Birleşik Devletler itibaren Plank, IA, Birleşik Devletler

Okuyucu Eduardo Guedes Guedes itibaren Plank, IA, Birleşik Devletler

Eduardo Guedes Guedes itibaren Plank, IA, Birleşik Devletler

eduguedes

Tamam, Lisa beni ikna ettin! Son zamanlarda Kirkus beni hayal kırıklığına uğratmasına rağmen, Kirkus yıldızlı bir inceleme yaptı. Beni mutlu edecek bir şeye ihtiyacım olduğunda ya da belki de kafam hiçbir şeye konsantre olamadığında, bu isabetli olabilir. Umuyorum. Her zaman bir kitapta şansım olabilir. Nörolojik olarak her kitabı tamamen saçma olan bir yaşam tercihi gibi kontrol ediyorum!

eduguedes

I couldn't put this book down, all 700-odd pages. It's a very accurate, and subsequently crass, depiction of modern college life. The story is well paced, with deep character developement. Read it before the planned movie comes out. Wolfe's story became both salient and relevant after the Duke lacrosse revelations. After enjoyment of Charlotte Simmons, I want to read Wolfe's Bonfire and Right Stuff.

eduguedes

Mitchell is one of the best history writers out there, and this is seriously one of the best history books I've read, if not the best. Truthfully, the title sums the book up in a way I can't: Egypt, techno-politics, and modernity. If you like any of those topics, you'll freak out over this book. There's not a clunker in this book, they're all riveting in their own way. Broadly, the book discusses "the relationship between expertise and the world to which it refers-- a world that, on closer inspection, never has the simplicity, logic, or fixedness that expertise assumes." (268) Many of the articles knocked my socks off: one talked about the invention of "the economy," in which he shows that "the economy" as an abstract idea was actually invented in the early/mid 20th century-- it wasn't discovered as an existing thing, but actually brought into being through a series of activities. Another chapter, "The Object of Development" is a stunning introduction to development and its discontents, he shows how IMF policies and USAID activities in Egypt have operated to create a market for highly-subsidized US agricultural products. Also, he shows that little of the billions and billions of development money supposedly going into Egypt is actually seeing Egyptian pockets-- over half stays in the US as "payment" for unpayable military debts, and the other half goes to American companies to "develop" Egypt. The first essay, "Can the Mosquito Speak?" is worth the price of the book. Possibly one of the most amazing pieces of history writing ever, he connects all these seemingly disparate elements-- malaria outbreaks, dam building, WWII, forced wheat cultivation-- to show the construction of a false dichotomy of nature and science. Science, which supposedly transcends natural processes, actually can only operate in cooperation with natural processes, and natural processes can easily and quickly unseat scientific advances.