abogh

Alex Bogh Bogh itibaren Ionia, Kansas 66949, Birleşik Devletler itibaren Ionia, Kansas 66949, Birleşik Devletler

Okuyucu Alex Bogh Bogh itibaren Ionia, Kansas 66949, Birleşik Devletler

Alex Bogh Bogh itibaren Ionia, Kansas 66949, Birleşik Devletler

abogh

İlk 100 sayfadaki en çekici roman gibi görünmeyebilir, ancak size yetişecektir. Çok eşsiz. Çok açıklayıcı.

abogh

Bu kitabı bugün doğum günüm için hediye olarak aldım. Okumak istedim - bugün de ablamın tavsiyesine yarım gün izin verdim, bu da bana yeni bir romana başlamam için zaman veriyor. Bir inceleme gelebilir!

abogh

A good debut with some truly inspired writing, but it didn't carry me all the way through to the end. Recently, I've begun learning more about African art - with a specific focus on Yoruba art and culture. One of the things I've learned is the importance of twins in Yoruba culture - and that emphasis on the "doubled self" has helped me have a different understanding of The Icarus Girl . Jessamy is an intelligent, highly imaginative biracial 8-year old. Her mother, a writer, is from Nigeria and her father is a white man; the family lives in England. Upon my second read, I did indeed pick up more of the Yoruba mythology: the importance of twins, the references to various orisha, the role of the ibeji (or twin) statue. But I'm also left discomfited by the subtle associations with black womynhood = bad and whiteness = confused/innocent/unable to understand. The mother in the book seems withholding, immature, uncomfortable with her own bicultural identity, competitive with her daughter and domineering. Jess' father is presented as hapless, caring - a push over, unable to withstand the assertive power of his wife. It is an uncomfortable portrait - made more complex by the relationship between Nigeria and England: a colonial history, in which England was the dominator and Nigeria was the oppressed. My initial view of the book holds - a strong debut with great language and an inventive story. But here I wonder about my responsibility as a reader: how much research should I do in order to understand a book? I think had I known or done more, than I would have understood more in my first reading. And I also think that it would have benefitted the book to have a bibliography or brief explanation for the background and history of the book. But then I think: how unfair. Why should the author have to explain her culture for my benefit? It's tricky, but with a novel that turns on cultural knowledge, it would have been helpful to have some hints as to what cultures and practices were being referenced. Lastly, some parts of the novel could have been slightly shorter. I particularly liked Jess' grandfather, Obenga, who was able to navigate and manage a bicultural identity, in a healthy way, while also truly being able to see, know, and ultimately save Jessamy.

abogh

This was a typical Jodi Picoult book, a lot like "My Sisters Keeper". I enjoyed it up to the end. The end ruined the whole book for me. I did not think it was necessary. I would give this a zero if I could.