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Tab Jethro Lai Jethro Lai itibaren Texas itibaren Texas

Okuyucu Tab Jethro Lai Jethro Lai itibaren Texas

Tab Jethro Lai Jethro Lai itibaren Texas

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Philippa Gregory. Sana nasıl tapıyorum. Belirli bir tarihsel konuda nasıl bu kadar öğrenildiğini seviyorum ve bu iyi bilinen olaylara tanık olduklarından üçüncü bir kişinin bakış açısından kurgu yazma yeteneğine sahip. Karakterleri ilgi çekicidir ve bu kitap tüm tarihsel kurgu romanlarının olması gerektiği gibi nefis serpilir. Sonuçta, onu sevdi. Bu kitap Philippa Gregory ile olan aşk ilişkimin başlangıcıydı.

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İyi yazılmış ve orta derecede ilgi çekicidir. Amerika'ya gelmek, kendinizi tanımak, ailenizle ve kültürel mirasınızla uzlaşmakla ilgili bir aile destanı. Lahiri'nin kısa öyküler koleksiyonu kadar zevk almadım, ama sağlam bir okuma.

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Ölü Bebekler Martin Amis (2004)

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I know this isn't the point, but I always dug the idea that Othello and Desdemona probably had excellent sex. You know, until he killed her and all.

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This is one of the most stunning books I've read as it is a very alternative interpretation on a pretty well known story. It was black listed by the pope for its portrayal of Christ as a man with humanly desires and frustrations. An interesting twist turns Mary Magdalene into the woman Jesus was supposed to marry from childhood; another one questions Judas as the betrayer...Very interesting book. I still think about it and it's been about 6 years since I read it.

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3 5/8 stars I'm a big fan of the novelization of fairy tales. Robin McKinley is like a patron saint to me. You get all of the archetypal/ cultural symbolism and style with the added benefit of a novel's in-depth story and characterization. And I liked this book - it started out as a really strong 4 star contender. But when it strayed from the fairytale premise, style, and feel; my enthusiasm for the story waned. On the surface, this is a retelling of the fairytale Snowhite and Rosered. It is also a story about surviving emotional trauma. This book, in a nutshell, is a fairytale like story of surviving rape. It is all about the weariness of being a woman. The protagonist, Liga, is a woman who has been raped with such viciousness and regularity that she has escaped into a magical, safe haven/ alternate reality of her own creation, where she can safely raise her two daughters - the products of her various rapes. So rape pretty much permeates this book. Actual rapes and symbolic rapes run rampant. When the wicked dwarf enters Liga's heavenly alternate reality he actually forces himself through a very vagina-like, gray opening (as it is described in the book) that is hovering in the air. And I'm writing this and I'm realizing that this is sounding all glib and snooty - but that is now how I mean it to be - I take very seriously the central theme and plot of this book - but I just can't get my mind to figure out how I feel about this book. And even though this a fairytale and even though revenge (if not justice) is served, Lanagan has some very poignant things to relate to us about survival. Survival has a price. As Liga finds out as she emerges from her fantasy world only to find that she is 10 years older than she should be - the price of survival can be the loss of years, and chances - love and youth and beauty can leave you behind. And of course these truths are all beautiful and melancholy and they will make you ache. But I had some problems, the least of which was that I felt that at least 100 pages could be chopped from this book without loosing anything in terms of plot, character, style or substance. The end, especially, seemed to drag on and on as every flap had to be buttoned down and every character (and there were a whole lot of them) had to be decided in their situations. And there were a ton of POV's to go along with the hordes of characters. Which, to say the least, could be very confusing - especially when the men all told their stories in first person but when we switched to the world of the women all of their stories were told in 3rd person. Sometimes I would get Liga and her 2 daughters confused. As I mentioned before, there was a point in the story (about 1/2 way through the book) that the story started to drift away from the fairytale feel and started to venture into something that felt more like contemporary, womens' survivor literature. And I have nothing against either genre, but I found the sudden switch from one to the other to be a bit jarring. And then my other irritation was - now that I found myself in incest survivor's lit - where was Lega's anger? And how exactly - having been mostly raised by a subhuman rapist - did Liga become such an excellent parent herself - with no qualms, insecurities, or any missteps? What exactly was Lanagan trying to say with all of this beautiful, movingly written, sprawling narrative? I was more than a little disturbed by the fact that when any real man - besides the evil dwarf - entered Liga's alternate reality they were in the form of a bear. And even the good and kind bear who first encounters Liga's family (as opposed to the lecherous, creepy 2nd bear) and who could see into Liga's very soul, in the real world, could not see beyond her slightly advanced years. Instead, he looks right past her to the beauty and bloom of her daughter. So all men are bears/ beasts - even the most honorable of men - and are unable to see past their baser instincts and only a lucky,unbroken, and beautiful woman can find love. If this is what Lanagan was trying to say - and I think I could make a pretty strong case for this given all of the perpetual, unrelenting misery that Liga must endure- I don't think I can jive 100% with that sentiment. I think that women are just as much prey to their baser instincts as men. But where I do see a difference between the sexes, is in how women irrevocably link love and lust. Dr. Drew on Loveline even talked about this. How there was a study that showed that after a woman had only a few sexual experiences with a partner there was a hormone released in her brain that emotionally bonded her to that partner. The same hormone release is not present in men. So - I can at least partially concede to some of Lanagan's sentiment, in that the physical act is that much more important to a woman - emotionally. And that rape (especially at the hands of a loved one - a father) is that much more of an affront to a woman's psyche. Life is unfair, the politics of sex are unfair - survival is a tenuous and terrible pursuit, at best. But I want my fairy tales to portray what should happen. I want there to be justice. I want Liga to find love not some sort of strange competition with her daughter and yet even more aching loss. I wanted melancholy and bittersweet - not despair and emptiness. Still, I'm complaining about a book that I really enjoyed. But you know, really crappy literature eats your brain; it doesn't stimulate your thoughts or haunt you. And this book has really made me think - and it has definitely haunted me. Two and half stars for driving me crazy - but I'm adding another 1 1/8 star for the profound aftershocks of this reading (aftershocks in a good way). So what I liked about this book was that I encountered yet another protagonist who finds an ingenious and imaginative way to survive the unthinkable (see this also in Set This House in Order). And what I liked most about this book was the shared, intimate tellings. Women and men alike, in quiet moments unburdening their souls. So maybe that is the point of Lanagan's book - never underestimate the power of a shared story to just one (or millions if you count the readers of the novel), non-judgemental listener.