cgandolfo

Carlos Gandolfo Gandolfo itibaren Vidovishte, Makedonya (FYROM) itibaren Vidovishte, Makedonya (FYROM)

Okuyucu Carlos Gandolfo Gandolfo itibaren Vidovishte, Makedonya (FYROM)

Carlos Gandolfo Gandolfo itibaren Vidovishte, Makedonya (FYROM)

cgandolfo

Point Blank, nezih bir kitaptı ama en sevdiğim Catherine Coulter FBI hikayesi değildi. İkili hikaye çizgileri kitap boyunca beni çok ilgilendirmeye devam etti, ancak sonu biraz hayal kırıklığı yarattı.

cgandolfo

ulaşması en zor kitaplardan biri (yalnızca diğerleri benim zevklerim hakkında bir şeyler söylerse Virginia Woolf'un kitapları oluyor), çünkü açıkçası ilginç bir şey olmuyor. Yazarın çok ince arsada ruh hali yaratmak için kullandığı yükseltilmiş dil, bilinçli ve gereksizdir. Hikâyelerinin anlattığı efsanevi efsaneye rağmen kendimi bu kızkardeşlere bakarken bulamadım.

cgandolfo

Bunu sesle dinledim ve harikaydı. Kesinlikle çok ilgi çekici.

cgandolfo

Bu kitaba dört yıldız veriyorum, çünkü her şeye katılıyorum, ama ilgi çekici ve kesinlikle beni düşündürdü. Onu dinledim ve yazar tarafından daha enerjik hale geldi ve zaman zaman, evet, çileden çıkardı. Çin ve Batı ebeveynliği hakkındaki iddialarının birçoğu genellemeleri süpürüyordu ve keşke tarzına daha fazla ebeveynlik olarak değinmiş olsaydı. Görüş ve düşüncelerinin çoğu mantıklıydı. Ancak bu, birçok kültürde bulunabilen oldukça seçkin, kontrol ucube, A tipi bir annedir.

cgandolfo

Read this book twice: once for pleasure and once to pay attention to the religious evolution. It's a fine example of how a faith/cult can come about, and the book has some tasty bits of philosophy in it, borrowed and adapted from current world faiths, and melded in a way that works beautifully. Can you tell I'm a sucker for this book? I adore the series.

cgandolfo

A really interesting collection of essays. When she started introducing the ideas of role-models and the lack there-of for African-Americans I was a little confused. She brought in the realm of music as an area in which black men could express themselves fully. Where they could be honest with their feelings, emotions and the expression of pain and weakness; especially using the idea that this was a positive aspect of the blues (and jazz, referencing Coltrane), but is totally lacking in hip-hop music. I found it odd that she completely ignores soul music - an almost totally African-American music, linked strongly with the civil rights movement - that typically expresses love and tenderness, even if it can often be based within patriarchal norms. Equally noticeable was the total lack of recognition for any socially-conscious hip-hop music, which has been developing as a movement outside of the mainstream for a decade or more. The following almost reads like a breakdown of several of hooks' essays: Talib Kweli lyrics from 'Joy' (2002) "I do it for the seeds y'all, in they formative years when they need y'all we gotta believe, in what we conceive y'all, it's deep y'all I give them the truth, so they approach the situation, with ammunition I keep nothing away, they hear everything, cause they know how to listen Teach them the game, so they know they position, so they can grow and make decisions, that change the world, and break old tradition They put kids in jail, for a life they ain't even get to start that's murder too, and it's breaking my heart, it's breaking our nation apart We gave the youth all the anger, it's just we ain't taught them, how to express it, and so it's dangerous You can't talk to them Unless your language is relating to what they going through so busy ignoring them, you can't see what they showing you And you wonder, why we called baby-daddy's and baby-momma's when we grow up, we can't act like adult mothers and fathers, yo I'm so blessed to have a boy and a girl, everyday they bring joy to my world" Considering the book was published in 2004, there were several bands and musicians working within hip-hop producing socially conscious anti-sexist, anti-violent music (Michael Franti, Jurassic 5, Ozomatli, Mos Def, Black Star... etc) Lastly, I'm aware as a middle-class English white male - ticking off almost every box in her imperialist white-supremacist-capitalist-patriarchy - that I'm probably not really the intended audience for this work, but found most of the problems she introduces as black problems were my own growing up in a working-class town with a depressive-father. As an adolescent, my personal heroes were Bruce Lee and Jimi Hendrix, neither of whom was white. I almost totally rejected the Beatles and John Lennon, who were both brought up within three miles of my home. Is it not possible that young African-American men could look beyond race boundaries to look for their heroes?