mgilbertdedbb7

Marc Gilbert Gilbert itibaren San Agustin, Bolivya itibaren San Agustin, Bolivya

Okuyucu Marc Gilbert Gilbert itibaren San Agustin, Bolivya

Marc Gilbert Gilbert itibaren San Agustin, Bolivya

mgilbertdedbb7

Nazare ol adam tu shere hayır ye nemooneye monhaser be farde

mgilbertdedbb7

** spoiler alert ** This is actually a novelization of the comics arc, and while it's missing several things that make the arc in the comics so compelling (most of the Two Face-Montoya arc, the Dick/Babs romance [but also the weird Dick/Helena kiss at the end], Catwoman's sadly minor part, Huntress v. Scarecrow at the church, Tim's stint as the tragic face of NML), it does really well following the main storyline, and I love Huntress even more now, and was even angrier at Batman's treatment of her. I suspected from the comics that he knew exactly what would happen when he stripped her of Batgirl's costume (um, he didn't literally strip her, that would be weird, considering), that he'd pretty much planned the whole thing, and the book confirms it, and it really pisses me off. On the plus side, no Azrael cluttering up the arc, and I enjoyed the sections from Cass's POV, especially the bits with her father.

mgilbertdedbb7

You know a book borderline sucks when the best short story was written by Cassandra Clare, plagiarizer extraordinaire (or so I've heard). Now, I'm not a CC-hater; in fact, I semi-enjoyed reading her Mortal Instruments trilogy (or, at the very least, the 1.5 books of it I've read) but only for the stunningly gorgeous Jace. Moving on though. I wanted to love this short story collection but I didn't. I couldn't. Most stories were subpar at best (with the exception of the above mentioned author, Libba Bray, and Garth Nix). Libba's story was fantastic in that it was about growing up and the Rocky Horror Picture Show-- unlike the other stories I'd read, Libba wasn't pressing her geekiness on me, it was more of an understated geeky story. And I liked that. On the other hand, Garth Nix's story was about a boy who didn't talk due to an accident early on in life but who was known as the Silent Knight (from what I remember) in his role-playing group. It was a cutesy little story that had adorable ending. Double thumbs up. And finally, Clare's story, I Never, brought Catherine Earnshaw, Heathcliff, and Mr. Kool-Aid into the modern day real world with an adorable little twist. Read it, seriously. There were two authors whose short stories I had most looked forward to but had let me down greatly: David Levithan and John Green. David Levithan's story was cutesy but lacked the depth I've come to associate with him, it felt forced and unnatural-- plus, I hated the main character. Whilst Levithan's story had been a letdown, I was most disappointed with John Green's piece as I've never read anything by him that I did not like. In my opinion, there was no plot or structure and the two female characters, Kayley and Lauren, were one dimensional. It left a bad taste in my mouth. I guess there really is a first time for everything. Clearly there were other stories but unfortunately they either a)weren't memorable enough for me to write about or b) I just didn't appreciate. Too bad, so sad. With Geektastic: Stories from the Nerd Herd, I felt kind of let down. Perhaps I had hyped it up too much in my head or maybe I'm just not geeky enough to appreciate it or maybe, just maybe, the stories borderline sucked.

mgilbertdedbb7

Hyman Kaplan attends the American Night Prepatory School in a valiant effort to master the English language, with hilarious results. He and his fellow students from a variety of countries hear and understand English in very different ways, but somehow they manage to understand each other, sometimes. Originally serialized in The New Yorker.